Errol Abada Gatumbato

Mt. Kanla-on reopens for mountaineering

BY: ERROL A. GATUMBATO

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The active crater of the Kanla-on Volcano. Leiza May Gersalia photo*

The trails of the Mount Kanla-on Natural Park in Negros Island are once again open for mountaineering after they have been closed for a while due to volcanic alert level. The Phivolcs has recently lowered the Kanla-on Volcano’s alert level, from one to zero. MKNP Protected Area Superintendent Concordio Remoroza announced this development after his office has conducted site assessment. It was found out that the trails and campsites in the park are still serviceable. The summit of the MKNP, where the Kanla-on Volcano’s active crater is situated, towers at 2,435 meters above sea level. It is the highest peak in the Visayas and the 16th highest in the Philippines. In spite of the danger, the summit-crater is the ultimate destination for mountaineering in the MKNP.

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Margaha Valley, a dormant crater just below the existing and active crater. Leiza May Gersalia photo*

The volcano exploded without prior indication in August 1996 while there were 18 trekkers at the summit. It took the lives of three trekkers and wounded several others. The incident and other considerations prompted the MKNP’s Protected Area Management Board, at that time, to develop and implement mountaineering guidelines, which have been updated through the years. The guidelines include the automatic closure of the MKNP for mountaineering once the Phivolcs declares volcanic alert level 1 or higher. The MKNP is one of the favorite destinations of mountaineers because it is physically and emotionally challenging to reach its peak. The diverse and pristine sceneries along the trails and campsites are marvelous sites of different forest structures, colorful vegetation, and beautiful lagoons that can be viewed while one is progressing to higher elevations. There are four designated mountaineering trails in the MKNP.

The Guintubdan Trail in Sitio Guintubdan, shared by both La Carlota and Bago cities, is

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The author at the Guintubdan Entrance Station*

the most popular entry point. It is roughly 8.5 kilometers away from the summit-crater, and where the most breathtaking views of lush forests and numerous waterfalls are found. Some mountaineers may reach the peak using this trail within five to eight hours of continuous ascending hike. For those who wish for a more relaxing trek, there are two campsites along this trail where you can pitch a tent for overnight. The longest trail to the peak is the Wasay Trail, with the entrance located above the Mambukal Mountain Resort in Murcia. It will take two days to use this long, winding, and ascending trail to the summit with a distance of about 14 kilometers. This is the most picturesque trail, passing by the lovely “Hardin sang Balo” (widows’ garden), where various plants are competing for their beautiful colors and appearance amidst stunted trees, and the gorgeous PMS and RAMS lagoons.

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One of the waterfalls in the MKNP*

For adventurous trekkers, the Mananawin Trail in Brgy. Masulog, Canlaon City in Negros

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The view of the crater from the MKNP Administration Center in La Castellana*

Oriental might be one for you. While it is only seven-kilometer away from the crater, it will immediately expose climbers to direct and stiff assault terrain in open-cultivated and grassland areas with no water sources along the trail. The Mapot Trail in Brgy. Malaiba, also in Canlaon City, is a bit easier than Mananawin Trail, but it is also a direct assault kind of trail. The crater can be seen from these two entrance stations in Canlaon City when it is not cloudy.

The MKNP’s mountaineering season is during March, April, May, October, November, and December. A group, composed of a maximum of 10 trekkers, is allowed to trek in a day per trail during this period. The rest of the year is considered as low season, when only one group with a maximum of 10 trekkers is allowed in a month per trail. Issuance of mountaineering permit, with corresponding fees, from the PASu is a mandatory requirement in the MKNP. Climbing parties are required to submit booking form, mountaineer information sheet, and notarized waiver of responsibility of the expedition members. The booking shall be made at least three months before the expedition. The mountaineering fee is P500 for Filipinos and P1,000 for foreign nationals. There is an additional charge of P250 when you will be using different entry and exit points, except for Mananawin/Mapot entry and Wasay exit and vice-versa where additional fee of P450 will be charged.

The PAMB has imposed accreditation of porters and guides from communities, who underwent training on mountaineering and safety courses. It is mandatory to have a guide to a ratio of one guide to six trekkers. Hiring of porters is only optional. The fees are P750 and P500 per day for guiding and porter services, respectively.Compulsory climbing equipment and other materials are required, like individual sleeping bag, tent, pressure-stove for cooking, and personal first aid kit. Only ready-to-cook food is allowed and campfires are prohibited. The carry in-carry out policy is included in the guidelines. For further details and booking, you may email mknp.pasu@mail.com .*

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July 6, 2017 Posted by | Ecotourism, Forest Ecosystem, Mountaineering, Mt. Kanla-on, Protected Areas, Uncategorized | Leave a comment